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  • Dörnyei, Z. (2009) The psychology of second language acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Chapter 5)
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  • Oxford, R. & E. Horwitz, (2013). Preface to Gregersen, T. & MacIntyre, P., Capitalizing on language learners’ individuality: From premise to practice, Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters, pp. 1-4.
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