Vision and Imagination in Foreign Language Learning

Stephen Ryan (Senshu University, Tokyo), Martin Lamb (University of Leeds) & Florentina Taylor (University of York ), Ewa Guz & Małgorzata Tetiurka (John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin) & Letty Chan (University of Nottingham)

This symposium looks at some of the ways in which teachers and learners use their imaginations in language learning. We aim to show that, far from being a peripheral, optional concern, the imagination is a central, highly practical, yet under-researched part of the language learning process.

Faraway Visions: Connecting Home and Abroad through Mental Imagery

Stephen Ryan (Senshu University, Tokyo)

In this talk I consider how language learners imagine ‘abroad’ and how these mental images can impact upon learning. I explore some of the ways in which learners create images of abroad, how learners may employ them to direct learning and the practical implications this has for teachers.

Identity Change and Imagination in International Students in the UK

Martin Lamb (University of Leeds) & Florentina Taylor (University of York)

This presentation examines identity change among international MA TESOL students as they negotiate a space for themselves in new academic, social and professional communities. We report key results from a longitudinal study conducted at two UK universities, and consider the role that imagination plays in the fashioning of new identities.

Teacher Imaginations of Young Language Learners

Ewa Guz & Małgorzata Tetiurka (John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin)

Pedagogical success in primary L2 instruction is underpinned by teacher imagination. Young learners’ teachers need to temporarily step out of their adult shoes and perceive the world from a child’s perspective. The question of whether such a shift in thinking is feasible constitutes the major issue raised in this paper.

Facets of Imagery in Academic and Professional Achievements

Letty Chan (University of Nottingham)

Pedagogical success in primary L2 instruction is underpinned by teacher imagination. Young learners’ teachers need to temporarily step out of their adult shoes and perceive the world from a child’s perspective. The question of whether such a shift in thinking is feasible constitutes the major issue raised in this paper.